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Coveny and Konzen_Cropped
Coveny and Konzen_Cropped
some of the 41 people consecrated to the immaculate heart of mary at OLPH on OLG Feast
some of the 41 people consecrated to the immaculate heart of mary at OLPH on OLG Feast
CHM_Graduation 2020
CHM_Graduation 2020
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MS_Ash Wednesday_3
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S4_Pt. G_ML_SoFL Consr Renw_Pic 2
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OLA_Picture 2
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OLA_Priests_2021
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NDPMA_Faculty Ret_2
Holy Week from back of church - Station in foreground
Holy Week from back of church - Station in foreground
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IMG_9914
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NDV_Pic 1
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BP_Mass 1
We, the Marist priests and brothers, are members of the Society of Mary, an international religious congregation in the Catholic Church. We are men called to ‘be’ Mary - thinking, judging, feeling, and acting as Mary in all we do. Marist priests and brothers have been called by a “gracious choice” into the family of Mary.

A magazine published three times a year by The Marist Fathers and Brothers of the US Province.

Day 7 Lenten Reflection

“At our best, we are instruments of God’s mercy working to help others taste the boundless love of the Lord, especially those who find themselves on the margins. As Marists, we seek to go where the Church is not. We should enable all with whom we come in contact to experience the gift of reconciliation as well as peace of heart and mind.”

Stabat Mater
O our Mother, fount of love,
touch my spirit from above;
Help us love as you have done.

May Mary be Our Guide and Example of Courage in Lent.

(Quote Source: Statement of Identity, U.S. Province of the Marists)

(Image: “The sorrowful Virgin Mary holds her Son Jesus after His death”, by Elizabeth Wang)

Day 6 Lenten Reflection

Sin breaks always our relationship with God and one another rather than sustain it. Where there is an offending act, there is no mutual love. However, in the gospel of St. Matthew, Jesus tells us to be merciful to others (Mt.5,7). Humanely, we find it hard to forgive. However, we Marists should always remember our identity which is being instruments of Divine Mercy. Indeed, we have Jesus as the greatest model in being merciful. He declared even on the cross: “Father, forgive them, they know not what they do.” (Lk 23,34). Therefore, in this time of Lent, let us model ourselves on Him by reconciling with one another.

Stabat Mater
Can the human heart refrain?

From partaking in her pain,
In that Mother’s pain untold?

May Mary be Our Guide and Example of Courage in Lent.

(Image: “Jesus and Mary look on us with tenderness as we follow our own Way of the Cross”, by Elizabeth Wang)

(Quote Source: Original quote)

Day 5 Lenten Reflection

Lent can look to be a season of deprivation, a season of giving up certain creature goods. Rather, Lent should be a time of deepening our inner life like zeroing in on the quality of our prayer life. It is also a time to fast from selfish pursuits and focus on our relationship with the Lord and our Blessed Mother. Finally, we seek to be generous in reaching out to the needy and disenfranchised.

Stabat Mater
Is there one who would not weep,
Whelmed in miseries so deep,
Christ’s dear Mother to behold?

May Mary be Our Guide and Example of Courage in Lent.

(Image: “Jesus and Mary look on us with tenderness as we follow our own Way of the Cross” , by Elizabeth Wang)

(Quote Source: Original quote)

For the terminally ill

Let us pray that the sick who are in the final stages of life, and their families, receive the necessary medical and human care and accompaniment.

When some people talk about terminal illnesses, there are two words they often confuse: incurable and un-carable. But they are not the same. Even when little chance for a cure exists, every sick person has the right to medical, psychological, spiritual and human assistance. Sometimes they can’t talk; sometimes we think they don’t recognize us. But if we take them by the hand, we know they are relating with us.

Healing is not always possible, but we can always care for the sick person, caress them. Saint John Paul II used to say, “cure if it is possible; always take care.”

And this is where palliative care comes in. It guarantees the patient not only medical attention, but also human assistance and closeness. Families should not be left alone in these difficult moments. Their role is decisive. They need access to adequate means so as to provide appropriate physical, spiritual and social support.

Let us pray that the terminally ill and their families always receive the necessary medical and human care and assistance.

View the February Prayer Intention Pope Video – a global initiative to disseminate the Holy Father’s monthly intentions (Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network).